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Coronavirus vaccine news UK – Blood clot risk from catching Covid-19 is 10x HIGHER than having AstraZeneca jab


A TERRIFYING number of babies are mysteriously dying of Covid-19 in Brazil doctors have warned.

Despite overwhelming evidence the virus rarely kills young children, 1,300 babies have died from it over the past year.

Brazil’s coronavirus infection rate – the second highest in the world – a severe lack of testing and a President accused of failing to take the virus seriously enough are being blamed for the increased deaths.

Of course, the more cases we have and, as a result, the more hospitalisations, the greater the number of deaths in all age groups, including children,” Renato Kfouri, president of the Scientific Department of Immunisations of the Brazilian Society of Pediatrics told the BBC.

“But if the pandemic were controlled, this scenario could evidently be minimised,” he added.

It comes as a new study showed the risk of a brain blood clot after the AstraZeneca vaccine was five in a million, and four in a million after vaccines from Pfizer or Moderna

For people who had Covid, the risk was almost 40 in a million.

Researchers at Oxford – the same university that created the AstraZeneca vaccine – said either after the coronavirus or a jab, the risk of a brain blood clot in the following two weeks was very rare.

But comparing the two, they said the risk was “substantially and significantly higher” after Covid – which is largely avoidable with a vaccine.

The team also looked at rates of clotting in people who had the flu, which was zero.

And they said the risks of CVST after Covid was “many-fold” higher than in the general population, perhaps up to 100 times higher.

A similar pattern was seen for another serious clotting disorder, portal vein thrombosis, which affects blood supply to the liver. The condition has not been flagged by regulators.

Read our coronavirus live blog below for the very latest news and updates on the pandemic

  • MUTANT FEAR

    A new Covid variant from India has been detected in the UK, health officials have announced.

    A total of 77 confirmed cases of the strain have been identified as of April 14.

    Seventy-three cases are in England and four are in Wales.

    The variant has been labelled as “under investigation” along with six others in the UK.

    More on the story here

  • SIR DAVID ATTENBOROUGH ENJOYED ‘COMPLETELY DIFFERENT SOUNDTRACK’ OF LOCKDOWN

    Sir David Attenborough and his friends enjoyed the “completely different soundtrack” left after planes stopped flying over their homes during lockdown, the executive producer on his new show has said.

    The veteran broadcaster, 94, narrates a forthcoming documentary called The Year Earth Changed, detailing how the natural world adapted as much of the world’s human population took shelter amid the coronavirus pandemic.

    Filmed across five continents from March 2020, the Apple TV+ programme features footage of turtles hatching on once busy beaches and deer exploring city centres.

    Produced by the BBC Studios Natural History Unit, the special is launching on Friday April 16, ahead of Earth Day on April 22.

    Executive producer Mike Gunton said Sir David had told him he enjoyed being able to hear birdsong and other sounds of natural life during the early months of the pandemic.

  • CARE HOMES ‘FAILED’ BY LATERAL FLOW TEST ROLLOUT

    Care homes in England are being “failed” by a flawed rollout of rapid-result tests, an expert has warned as analysis of a pilot found “poor” adherence and no impact on outbreaks.

    The majority of staff in 11 Liverpool care homes carried out less than a third of the rapid-result lateral flow device tests required over six weeks between December and January, according to a pre-print paper.

    Researchers from the universities of Liverpool, Nottingham and Imperial College London found no significant difference in the proportion of care homes with outbreaks or the size of outbreaks when comparing the results with homes that were not participating in the pilot.

  • LONDON SURGE TESTING NEEDED TO ‘GET AHEAD OF MUTANT BUG’

    Surge coronavirus testing is needed when variants are identified so officials are able to “get ahead of the infection”, according to London’s regional director of Public Health England.

    Professor Kevin Fenton told BBC Radio 4: “As we begin the process of unlocking and re-entering society and mixing, even small numbers of variants, when they occur, can have the potential to spread relatively quickly.

    “And that is why we have such a proactive programme of screening for and testing for the new variants, and, where we have found, we surge.

    “We need to get ahead of the infection and not keep following behind it.”

  • BORDER CHAOS

    A woman in a “seven-hour queue” collapsed at Heathrow Airport “after a 90-minute argument over hotel quarantine”.

    The passenger was seen laying on the floor at the border control gate with a member of staff at her aid, as Covid checks created massive queues to get into the UK.

    Footage posted online on Monday afternoon shows the collapsed woman being tended to by staff – as many more passengers wait to be cleared through the border.   

    The person who recorded the ordeal claims the passenger had collapsed following a seven-hour wait for entry clearance.

    It is understood that the woman was in a 90 minute argument with Border Force officials before she collapsed. The airport said the individual did not have the appropriate paperwork for hotel quarantine.

  • DAVID HAYE LAUNCHES RAINBOW MASK TO THANK NHS HEROES 

    David Haye, Former World Heavyweight Boxing Champion and Founder of The Black Mask Company, has launched a rainbow mask to thank NHS heroes as a third of Brits appreciate their work more than ever.

    Research by The Black Mask Company has found the nation’s appreciation for the NHS has risen dramatically throughout the pandemic.

    The company is releasing a limited edition Rainbow Mask range, with 25% of the retail price being donated to NHS Charities, to thank NHS heroes.

    Mr Haye said: “Lockdowns and face masks are something I can’t wait to see the back of – not many of us wanted them to be mandated or for our movements to be so restricted.

    “But whilst we take steps out of lockdown life, it’s time to give back to our NHS heroes. The Rainbow Masks are worn to honour those that have worked so hard on the frontline to protect all of us.”

    The rainbow mask was launched to thank NHS heroes
  • IRELAND COVID-19 NUMBERS ‘BETTER THAN WE COULD HAVE HOPED FOR’

    Ireland’s Covid-19 numbers are “better than could have been hoped for” just a few weeks ago, the acting chief medical officer has said.

    Dr Ronan Glynn paid tribute to the population for “listening to the messages and sticking with this”.

    He said the country had gone from among the worst impacted in the EU in January to “continuing on a very positive path” to “amongst the best positioned in Europe at the moment in relation to this disease”.

  • GYM CHAIN LAUNCHES SERVICE TO CARRY EXHAUSTED MEMBERS HOME

    As gyms reopened at the beginning of this week, GYMBOX launched its latest innovation to support members on their return.  

    It introduced London’s first rickshaw service for gym-goers – to carry their exhausted bodies home after their first intense workout in a gym for months.  

    The service will be available all week.

    The science points to increased pain levels following an intense workout after a break from exercise, and Raquel Banuls, BSc Sports and Exercise Science, said: “Gym-goers will be inclined to push themselves harder first-time back in a proper gym environment, and this is likely to result in significant stress on the muscles after such a long break. 

    “In short, the first workout back might be painful, but repeated sessions will reduce muscle pain.”

    GYMBOX launched London's first rickshaw service for gym-goers
    GYMBOX launched London’s first rickshaw service for gym-goersCredit: GYMBOX
  • URSULA VON DER LEYEN RECEIVES FIRST COVID JAB

    Ursula von der Leyen has received her first Covid-19 vaccine.

    The President of the European Commission tweeted: “The swifter we vaccinate, the sooner we can control the pandemic.”

  • BREAKING – MORE JABS COULD BE NEEDED

    Pfizer’s boss has said he thinks it is “likely” people will need a third dose of the Covid-19 vaccine.

    Albert Bourla, 59, said a potential booster shot would be administered six to 12 months after someone had been fully vaccinated.

    “There are vaccines that are like polio that one dose is enough…and there are vaccines like flu than you need every year,” he said.

    “The Covid virus looks more like the influenza virus than the polio virus.”

    Read our breaking news story here

  • COVID DENIER DIES AFTER HOSTING ILLEGAL PARTIES

    A Covid denier has died from the virus just days after hosting two illegal events at his property.

    Hans Kristian Gaarder tested positive for the virus after dying on April 6 while at least a dozen people who attended his events have also tested positive.

    Just days before his death, the conspiracy theorist, 60, hosted two illegal gatherings at a barn on his property in Norway on March 26 and 27.

    He died just ten days later in Gran, a municipality around 40 miles north of Oslo.  

    Several attendees have since tested positive for coronavirus and had passed the virus onto their close contacts, NRK reported.

    Hans Kristian Gaarder tested positive for the virus after dying on April 6
    Hans Kristian Gaarder tested positive for the virus after dying on April 6
  • WHO WARNS COVID ‘NOWHERE NEAR DONE’

    Covid’s grip on the world is “nowhere near finished” as super variants are spawning a surge of new cases, the World Health Organisation has warned.

    Its special envoy Dr David Nabarro, said the UK is bucking the trend with falling cases and deaths while in most parts of the globe coronavirus is rampant.

    Addressing the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, Dr Nabarro said new variants will be a “regular” occurrence while the virus is still prevalent around the world.

    You can read more here

  • BOOZE SALES DOUBLED ON MONDAY

    Booze sales more than doubled in bars and restaurants on Monday compared with before the pandemic as eager Brits returned to the pub.

    Alcohol sales skyrocketed by 113.8 per cent compared to the same day in 2019 as thousands packed into outdoor beer gardens across England for the first time in months.

    Click here to read more

  • PLEA TO FOLLOW CORONAVIRUS RULES

    A senior public health official has urged caution as lockdown is lifted, with a warning that a “dangerous wave” of cases is hitting countries “on our doorstep”.

    Public Health England’s medical director Yvonne Doyle stressed the importance of following guidance as restrictions are eased.

    Dr Doyle said: “Our efforts over many months have helped to suppress the virus, but I want to stress how even more vital it is to follow guidance as we go back to doing the things we have missed for so long.”

  • BRITS HAPPY TO CONTINUE WORKING FROM HOME

    More than half of British workers would be happy to never return to the office.

    This is due to fears of germs, a lack of social distancing and being in a room with lots of other people, according to a poll of 1,000 employees.

    Nearly six in 10 (56%) feel anxious at the thought of being back in the office and 46% are apprehensive, while 24% are even feeling stressed.

    Other worries include lack of personal space (39%), colleagues not using hand sanitiser or soap (27%) and not enough communal cleaning (27%).

    Having to commute topped the list of anxieties (51%), followed by less flexible working (43%) and social distancing not being taken seriously (42%).

  • BOOSTER SHOTS MAY BE NEEDED

    The United States is preparing for the possibility that a booster shot will be needed between nine to 12 months after people are initially vaccinated against Covid-19, a White House official said today.

    While the duration of immunity after vaccination is being studied, booster vaccines could be needed, David Kessler, chief science officer for President Joe Biden’s Covid-19 response task force told a congressional committee meeting.

    “The current thinking is those who are more vulnerable will have to go first,” Kessler said.

  • END IN TIERS

    Outbreaks of the South African variant could be effectively tackled with local lockdown style restrictions, experts say.

    The highly transmissible variant, shown to weaken vaccine efficacy, currently makes up a small proportion of cases in the UK.

    But keeping it contained is imperative to avoid “derailing the vaccination programme”.

    Prof John Edmunds, an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Sage member, told ITV’s Peston: “What we are looking at in south London is an example of what we’ll see now in the coming months, as we try our best to keep that variant out or at as low a level as we possibly can, because if these mass testing events don’t work that well, and we don’t know yet.

    “I mean we’ll have to evaluate this one very carefully, then it’s possible that we’ll have to impose some sort of local restrictions back in place and nobody wants to do it.”

  • COVID MARSHALS TO BE DEPLOYED ACROSS ENGLAND

    An army of Covid marshals is set to be deployed across England after council bosses were alarmed by scenes of overcrowding when pubs threw open their doors again on Monday.

    Local authorities are calling in the cavalry to prevent the build up of large groups outside bars and restaurants, including long queues in the street to enter some boozers.

    Westminster Council, in the heart of London, is bringing back 50 such officials who will patrol the streets and ensure businesses and customers are complying with social distancing, according to The Times.

    You can read more here

  • PINT OR PERM?

    With restrictions easing across England, new research found that more people (24%) are eager to book in a trip to the hairdressers than the pub (15%).

    Capital Hair and Beauty, surveyed 1,000 UK adults to find out more about their post-lockdown retail and hospitality priorities and found that a trip to the hairdressers will be the first port of call for 12.6 million UK adults.

    A further quarter of women have also attempted to dye their own hair while salons have been closed, with more daring colours such as pandemic pink sweeping the nation.  

  • LATEST DATA

    Coronavirus deaths have plunged by 43 per cent in a week with 30 fatalities recorded in the last 24 hours.

    A further 2,672 Brits have tested positive for the virus since yesterday bringing the total amount of infections to 4,380,976.

     

  • NHS CANCER REFERRALS FALLS BY 8%

    Figures show 174,624 urgent cancer referrals were made by GPs in February, compared with 190,369 a year before – a year-on-year drop of 8 per cent.

    The number of patients sent for critical breast cancer checks were also down ten per cent on the previous year.

    Sara Bainbridge, head of policy at Macmillan Cancer Support, said the data “further illustrates the catastrophic impact of Covid-19 on cancer diagnosis and treatment”.

    She added: “Tens of thousands of people are still missing a diagnosis due to disruption caused by the pandemic, which could affect their prognosis.”

  • STURGEON ‘EMOTIONAL’ AFTER RECEIVING HER FIRST COVID VACCINE

    Scotland’s First Minister has said she was “emotional” after receiving her first Covid-19 vaccine and paid tribute to NHS staff involved in the rollout.

    Nicola Sturgeon became one of more than 2.5 million Scots to have received at least one dose of the vaccine on Thursday, being inoculated at the SSE Hydro in Glasgow.

    Allocated the Oxford/AstraZeneca dose, the First Minister said it would help to bolster her defence of the jag, which has caused concerns over some rare instances of blood clots.

    Speaking to the PA news agency after her vaccination, the First Minister said: “It was totally pain free, I didn’t feel a thing. The lovely woman who vaccinated me made it all really easy.

    “I guess like many people I felt quite emotional because it’s so important this vaccination programme in helping us all get back to normal.”

    Nicola Sturgeon said she was 'emotional' after receiving her first Covid-19 vaccine
    Nicola Sturgeon said she was ’emotional’ after receiving her first Covid-19 vaccineCredit: PA
  • BORDER CHAOS AS WOMAN COLLAPSES AT HEATHROW AFTER ’90-MINUTE QUARANTINE ROW’

    A woman collapsed at Heathrow “after a 90-minute argument over hotel quarantine” amid fears airport queues could last more than seven hours due to Covid checks.

    The passenger was seen laying on the floor at the border control gate with a member of staff at her aid as checks on traveller’s tests and quarantine plans create massive queues to get into the UK.

    Footage posted online on Monday afternoon shows the collapsed woman being tended to by staff – as many more passengers wait to be cleared through the border.

    The person who recorded the ordeal claims the passenger had collapsed following a seven-hour wait for entry clearance.

    It is understood that the woman had arrived about 10.30am. She then collapsed about 1pm after a 90-minute-long argument with Border Force officials.

  • 30 MORE PEOPLE DIE OF CORONAVIRUS IN THE UK

    The Government said a further 30 people had died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 as of Thursday, bringing the UK total to 127,191.

    Separate figures published by the UK’s statistics agencies show there have now been 151,000 deaths registered in the UK where Covid was mentioned on the death certificate.

    Health bosses also said that, as of 9am on Thursday, there had been a further 2,672 lab-confirmed cases in the UK.

    It brings the total to 4,380,976.

  • BLOOD CLOTS ‘VERY, VERY RARE’ AFTER AZ JAB – EXPERT

    The chance of getting blood clots after getting the AstraZeneca jab is “very, very rare”, says an expert.

    Prof Anthony Harnden told a Royal Society of Medicine’s Covid webinar: “We don’t want to stop the vaccination programme in these risk groups that we’ve identified, but we have said at the moment that we want to be cautious for the well under 30-year-olds.

    “It is a worry, but getting into context you’re still much much more likely to have a severe clot from Covid itself than the vaccination.”



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