Home Asian News "The people of Taiwan are much more vigilant" - Free Asia Taiwan

“The people of Taiwan are much more vigilant” – Free Asia Taiwan

Huang Jie, a city councilor in Taiwan’s southern Kaohsiung port since 2018, suffered an effort to expose her earlier this year, after she spoke out against a harsh crackdown. for the political opposition and peaceful dissident in Hong Kong, which China organized becomes a model by which it wants to take control of Taiwan.

Huang became famous in Taiwan in 2019 after she rolled her eyes at then-mayor of Kaohsiung Han Kuo-yu as she questioned him during a meeting, giving herself the nickname “Goddess of the Eyes”. .

Huang has won praise from people concerned about Han’s plans for a trade deal with China for squeezing Han in an attempt to figure out exactly what such a deal would entail.

Han, who is elected on a pro-China platform, supports business for the opposition Nationalist Party (KMT), continues to lose his job in 2020 following a campaign to summon voters, of which more than 97% of those voted to want him to go. .

The withdrawal comes after Han lost the January 2020 presidential election to Tsai by a gap of two and a half million votes after Tsai campaigned to reduce Chinese influence and try to undermine the background. the island’s democracy, for example, is Beijing’s treatment of Hong Kong.

But in February of this year, Han’s supporters made an unsuccessful attempt to summon Huang, based on accusations of her violating draconian national security laws led by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). imposed on Hong Kong.

Huang cried at the joy of the public at that time. But her opinion of the campaign was much more serious, two months after the event.

Huang told RFA in a recent interview: “I think it is difficult to know whether to laugh or cry. “We live in a free society, but they use their prerogatives to deal a blow to totalitarian dictatorships.”

“Now I think I can say with more certainty that I did nothing wrong,” she said. “Most people support me, so we should continue to work to advance that philosophy.”

Beware of danger

She said the imprisonment of most pro-democracy camps in Hong Kong and the ban on speeches related to the 2019 protest movement has awoken 23 million Taiwanese of the potential dangers of cooperating with China. National.

“Such big changes took place, not long after [1997] “The people of Taiwan are much more vigilant,” Huang said.

“It’s easy for freedom and democracy to disappear one day, so we should step up our efforts to defend democracy’s last fortress,” Huang said.

Huang has never been to Hong Kong, and now that she has spoken out against the persecution, she does not risk being arrested if she goes there in the future.

However, she was at peace with her decisions and called for many to be upfront about China’s human rights violations.

“If everyone was scared, then no one would be willing to speak up about such things,” Huang said.

Taiwan used to be ruled as a Japanese colony for 50 years before the end of World War II, but was occupied by the ROC in 1911 under the KMT (KMT) as part of the agreement. Tokyo’s postwar compensation with allies.

It has never been controlled by the Communist Party of China, nor is it part of the People’s Republic of China, but Beijing insists on reclaiming the island by force if necessary.

Public opinion polls showed that the violent crackdown of the anti-government protest movement in Hong Kong last year raised concerns for Taiwan’s democracy and national security, and only about 4 , 5% of Taiwan’s 23 million people welcome the idea of ​​Chinese rule.

The island began to transition to democracy following the death of President Chiang Ching-kuo in January 1988, beginning with direct elections to the legislature in the early 1990s and culminating in the election. The president’s first direct election, Lee Teng-hui, in 1996.

Reported by Man Hoi Yan for RFA Cantonese Service. Translated and edited by Luisetta Mudie.



RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Most Popular

Recent Comments